Schlumberger

Oilfield Review Summer 2000


Cover: Oilfield Review Summer 2000 Download file (0.35 MB PDF)
Editorial: Fitting Innovations Download file (0.37 MB PDF)

Seismicity in the Oil Field

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Seismicity in the Oil Field

In some areas, seismic activity, better known as earthquakes, can occur as a result of oil and gas production. In this article, we review the modern history of human-induced seismic activity, and present the findings of a recent project to monitor injection- and production-related seismicity. Scientists in Russia, in a cooperative project with Schlumberger, are analyzing the seismic energy recorded during these events to extract information about the reservoir, to more fully characterize the state of stress in the field and to optimize the recovery of reserves.


The Little Pumper That Could

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The Little Pumper That Could

When it comes to oilfield equipment, bigger does not always mean better, cheaper or easier to operate. A fit-for-purpose cement pumper offers better maneuverability, lighter weight and improved reliability, and increases the efficiency of cementing operations. While initially designed for use in western Canada, the new pumper is improving onshore low-pressure cementing operations worldwide.


The Next Step in Collaborative Training

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The Next Step in Collaborative Training

E&P industry downturns have resulted in a significant downsizing of oil company training departments, yet training to keep abreast of technology advances and improve safety remains a pressing need. A new industry-university consortium formed NExT (Network of Excellence in Training) to satisfy this continuing need. The NExT initiative, which combines the rigors of academic programs with operational industry experience, is designed to advance the state of the art in training.


Growing Interest in Gas Hydrates

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Oilfield Review Summer 2000

Gas hydrates - ice-like compounds containing methane and other natural gases.cause problems in many oilfield operations, but also may become a significant energy resource if ways can be found to reach them. This article briefly reviews what is known about hydrates and describes how several of the techniques designed to find and evaluate oil and gas reserves can be used to characterize the properties of hydrates and map their distribution in the earth.


Contributors
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All pages in this issue
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