Schlumberger

Seismic for Unconventional Resources

Identify sweet spots, maximize recovery

More and more operators are realizing tremendous value from using seismic services in unconventional reservoirs. In frontier plays, sweet spot identification is essential to reducing uncertainty, high-grading acreage, and improving economics. Integrating and visualizing data from a comprehensive set of sources and using petroleum systems modeling further reduces risk and increases confidence.

Using seismic data to compute key elastic parameters, such as Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, and to map both reservoir quality and completion quality helps optimize drilling locations. Whether you are looking at a mature play or a single well, seismic data play an important role in microseismic and stimulation modeling, seismic guided drilling, and borehole seismic interpretation.

Using seismic to maximize recovery in unconventionals

Integration of seismic and other well data targets unconventional reservoir sweet spots through reservoir- and completion-quality predictions.

Petrotechnical evaluation is the key to maximizing recovery in complex reservoirs. It's with the quantitative interpretation of seismic data that Schlumberger engineers are able to visualize the downhole environment and produce a reservoir quality prediction map that will guide completion design.

Microseismic Services

Perform microseismic monitoring during hydraulic fracturing to obtain information on progressive fracture growth and the subsurface response to pumping variations.



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Define Reservoir Properties to Predict Shale Production

Image shows the borehole pressure distribution in the producer well.
Integrated seismic-to-simulation workflow reliably identifies the highest-productivity sweet spots in shale play. Read case study

Multiclient Data for North America Unconventionals

Vector Seismic data processing
Vector Seismic 2D and 3D multiclient surveys provide high-quality imaging to identify emerging unconventional plays. Visit Vector Seismic page